MG Sports Cars

engine swaps and other performance upgrades, plus "factory" and Costello V8s

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robert1839
Tristan Cook
5579 Timber Ridge Dr, Mt Vernon, Skagit, Washingto
(118 posts)

Registered:
05/06/2013 11:11PM

Main British Car:
MGB GT 1972 Buick 215

shop safety
Posted by: robert1839
Date: January 15, 2014 12:13AM

in my auto shop class we have learned many shop safety rules and once a month we do a shop safety meeting we all sigh in and talk about any rules we need clarified or that we saw where not fallowed that month. so i am doing my auto shop final on my car and i wanted to have some pics of the car that inspired me to start the conversion in the first place, witch is Bill Jacobson's car witch i am sure u all have seen its really amazing and i hope one day i can have my car looking as good as his. but what am i to do when i see this he used 2 by 4s on his lift under his car witch is clearly a shop safety hazard! haha i am only teasing of course, if you looked in my garage there would be a few safety hazards u could point out... now if u will exuse me i am going to go fix thos before anyone sees my mistakes haha and posts a thing about them (:

for copy right stuff the pic is Bill Jacobson's car here is a link to view his car
[www.britishv8.org]

BillJacobson-DX.jpg


88v8
Ivor Duarte
Gloucestershire UK
(682 posts)

Registered:
02/11/2010 04:29AM

Main British Car:
1974 Land Rover Lightweight V8

Re: shop safety
Posted by: 88v8
Date: January 15, 2014 04:10AM

4x2s are OK so long as the load is across the grain, not along it. Used a lump of teak atop my trolley jack saddle for years and years.

There might be a square inch or two of my car would clean up like that lol

Ivor


ex-tyke
Graham Creswick
Chatham, Ontario, Canada
(1080 posts)

Registered:
10/25/2007 11:17AM

Main British Car:
1976 MGB Ford 302

authors avatar
Re: shop safety
Posted by: ex-tyke
Date: January 15, 2014 09:28AM

Quote:
Used a lump of teak atop my trolley jack saddle for years and years....

Must be an-teak!


robert1839
Tristan Cook
5579 Timber Ridge Dr, Mt Vernon, Skagit, Washingto
(118 posts)

Registered:
05/06/2013 11:11PM

Main British Car:
MGB GT 1972 Buick 215

Re: shop safety
Posted by: robert1839
Date: January 15, 2014 10:15AM

well in the safety video and book for the lifts it said no wood at all or any other things like cinder blocks or bits of old tire. we where talking about in my class that if u did use wood and something happened they say it was your fault and insurance wouldn't cover it because u used wood on the lift


TR6-6SPD
Ken Hiebert
Toronto Ontario
(245 posts)

Registered:
04/23/2008 11:43AM

Main British Car:
1972 TR6 1994 5.7 L GM LT1

authors avatar
Re: shop safety
Posted by: TR6-6SPD
Date: January 15, 2014 10:24AM

I always use a square of plywood between the jack and the jacking point. I think it is less likely to slip and also helps to prevent damage. I don't know, I never really thought this to be risky behavior.....


danmas
Dan Masters
Alcoa, Tennessee
(574 posts)

Registered:
10/28/2007 12:11AM

Main British Car:
1974 MGBGT Ford 302

authors avatar
Re: shop safety
Posted by: danmas
Date: January 15, 2014 11:42AM

I'm no expert, but if wood works here, I'd think it would be OK for our cars.
image.jpg


MGBV8
Carl Floyd
Kingsport, TN
(3744 posts)

Registered:
10/23/2007 11:32PM

Main British Car:
79 MGB, Buick 215

authors avatar
Re: shop safety
Posted by: MGBV8
Date: January 15, 2014 12:32PM

Wow, they actually moved that brick house!



danmas
Dan Masters
Alcoa, Tennessee
(574 posts)

Registered:
10/28/2007 12:11AM

Main British Car:
1974 MGBGT Ford 302

authors avatar
Re: shop safety
Posted by: danmas
Date: January 15, 2014 12:43PM

Carl,

That one was a piece of cake!
image.jpg


DiDueColpi
Fred Key
West coast - Canada
(1259 posts)

Registered:
05/14/2010 03:06AM

Main British Car:
What if the Hokey Pokey really is what it's all about?

authors avatar
Re: shop safety
Posted by: DiDueColpi
Date: January 15, 2014 01:11PM

You're right Tristan,
OSHA, ANSI and the ALI forbid any type of blocking on a vehicle lift.
Cu-do's to your instructor for getting you guys started off on the right foot.
The ALI specifically states that "if the vehicle can not be properly placed on a lift using only the manufacturers supplied adapters. Then you must use another lift that fits correctly."
I have never had a vehicle fall from a hoist in 35+ years in this trade, but I have seen a few fall and it's not pretty.
4000 or so pounds of metal move a lot faster than you would think.
Insurance companies won't touch you with a ten foot pole if they find blocks on your lift. (you are covered for hoist use aren't you?)
And where I live workers comp will shut you down and require re-certification if they see it.
I know that lots of guy's want to protect their hard work from damage.
And I'm one of them.
But wood blocks are a very bad choice.
They split, flex and slide when oily or wet.
I would rather have a scratch on my frame than be painted the injury colour (flat black).
Cheers
Fred


robert1839
Tristan Cook
5579 Timber Ridge Dr, Mt Vernon, Skagit, Washingto
(118 posts)

Registered:
05/06/2013 11:11PM

Main British Car:
MGB GT 1972 Buick 215

Re: shop safety
Posted by: robert1839
Date: January 16, 2014 08:13AM

yes we had to get a 100% oh all the safety test for all the tools we use and general shop safety and we go over it for the first mouth for the Insurance companies so we are covered (:.if we got anything less than a 100% we have to retake that test till we do get a 100% and we cant go in the shop till we finish all the tests


MGBV8
Carl Floyd
Kingsport, TN
(3744 posts)

Registered:
10/23/2007 11:32PM

Main British Car:
79 MGB, Buick 215

authors avatar
Re: shop safety
Posted by: MGBV8
Date: January 16, 2014 10:33AM

I have watched houses being moved here, but they are smaller non-brick veneer houses.


smelfi
Steve Melfi
Alexandria Ohio
(90 posts)

Registered:
04/26/2008 07:35AM

Main British Car:
1977 MGB 302

authors avatar
Re: shop safety
Posted by: smelfi
Date: January 16, 2014 12:32PM

Corvairs used to fall from the back end of lifts. Guys would position them on the lift with the rear of the car extending further off the back of the lift than the front of the lift, same as they did with a standard car where most of the weight (engine/trans) is in the front.
I didn't see it happen but I saw the end result once of one that came off while the lift was fully extended.


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