Triumph Sports Cars

engine swaps and other performance upgrades, plus "factory" V8s (Stag and TR8)

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RyanS
Ryan S

(7 posts)

Registered:
12/15/2013 07:10PM

Main British Car:


Fuel tank venting TR6
Posted by: RyanS
Date: March 06, 2014 09:25PM

As I'm learning about the stock TR6 carbon canister, and the associated routing and anti- run on valve, I wonder if there is a better way to handle it for the Ford 302 carbed conversion. I will need to run my fuel supply line on the outside of the inner drivers frame rail (similar to Calvins) as opposed to the inner side as it is run in the stock config. If I can do away with the vent line running all the way up to the front, and somehow vent the tank in the rear it would be preferrable, but I don't want a smell issue, nor a fire hazzard.

What have some of you other guys done to vent the fuel tank?

Ryan


DiDueColpi
Fred Key
West coast - Canada
(1267 posts)

Registered:
05/14/2010 03:06AM

Main British Car:
What if the Hokey Pokey really is what it's all about?

authors avatar
Re: Fuel tank venting TR6
Posted by: DiDueColpi
Date: March 07, 2014 02:57AM

It's no secret that I'm a big fan of retaining the charcoal canister.
It costs nothing in horsepower.
It eliminates the fuel smell when the car is sitting.
And it's just better for the environment.
You can hide it out of the way in an inner fender or under the car.
Just never inside the passenger compartment or trunk.
Captured fuel fumes will wreck your whole day.
There are tons of different shapes and sizes available in the wrecking yards.
Run at least one anti siphon loop in the tank line and you're good to go.
Cheers
Fred


Jim Stabe
Jim Stabe
San Diego, Ca
(787 posts)

Registered:
02/28/2009 10:01AM

Main British Car:
1966 MGB Roadster 350 LT1 Chevy

authors avatar
Re: Fuel tank venting TR6
Posted by: Jim Stabe
Date: March 07, 2014 09:32AM

Fred

Could you draw up a simple diagram of how to hook one up using only what is necessary. The factory has a ton of tubes running everywhere.


RyanS
Ryan S

(7 posts)

Registered:
12/15/2013 07:10PM

Main British Car:


Re: Fuel tank venting TR6
Posted by: RyanS
Date: March 07, 2014 11:35AM

I'll second the simple diagram please.

Thank you

Ryan


BlownMGB-V8
Jim Blackwood
9406 Gunpowder Rd., Florence, KY 41042
(6003 posts)

Registered:
10/23/2007 12:59PM

Main British Car:
1971 MGB Blown,Injected,Intercooled Buick 340/AA80E/JagIRS

authors avatar
Re: Fuel tank venting TR6
Posted by: BlownMGB-V8
Date: March 10, 2014 05:38PM

It's really pretty simple. A largish purge line feeds fumes to the rocker breather and through the engine and PCV to the intake. Smaller lines collect fumes from carb bowl and tank. Often the bottom is open as a vent for excess fumes and to allow fresh air in when it is being purged, and allow the PCV system to operate.

Jim


Addicted
Mike Hagadorn
Warren PA
(132 posts)

Registered:
09/27/2013 03:46PM

Main British Car:
1976 TR7 Victory Edition Ford 302

Re: Fuel tank venting TR6
Posted by: Addicted
Date: March 10, 2014 09:16PM

The first diagram on this page looks pretty simple (early system).
I've been contemplating evap vs an open vent myself.
[www.agcoauto.com]


DiDueColpi
Fred Key
West coast - Canada
(1267 posts)

Registered:
05/14/2010 03:06AM

Main British Car:
What if the Hokey Pokey really is what it's all about?

authors avatar
Re: Fuel tank venting TR6
Posted by: DiDueColpi
Date: March 11, 2014 01:07PM

Excellent diagram Mike,
I've been getting lots of requests to draw something up and have been a little tardy.
For lots of conversions there won't be a usable vent fitting on the carb float bowl.
If you are fuel injected you won't have that fitting as well.
So you will need to plug that port on the canister.
I like to use the early Gm canisters as all the fittings are marked on the top of the unit.
The correct ones will be from a carbed vehicle and have a vacuum operated diaphragm on top.
Some fuel injected units will work as well but most are electronically controlled and more difficult to fit.
The GM ones are generally large round canisters.
A better fit is often available from Ford as most of them were a more rectangular shape.
These canisters were used in just about everything from the 70s and 80s. From Alfa's to Z....somethings.
So a perusal of your local automobile re-purposing establishment will turn up lots of possibilities.
Canister sizing is important and this is one time that bigger is better.
The size is determined by the gas tank volume so pick one from a vehicle with a bigger tank than yours.
Most aftermarket carbs will have a vent port that you can use instead of tying into the PCV. system.
That gives you more options for hose routing and removes the possibility of fuel contaminating the crankcase.
Hope that helps someone

Cheers
Fred



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