Engine and Transmission Tech

tips, technology, tools and techniques related to vehicle driveline components

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88v8
Ivor Duarte
Gloucestershire UK
(521 posts)

Registered:
02/11/2010 04:29AM

Main British Car:
1974 Land Rover Lightweight V8

The not so flat lifter.
Posted by: 88v8
Date: January 19, 2017 09:16AM

A question on another forum made me think; some of you knowledgeable chaps will know.

So-called 'flat lifters', generally have a slight radius.
Was this always so? If not when did the practice start?

Ivor


Citron
Stephen DeGroat
Lugoff, SC
(359 posts)

Registered:
10/23/2007 09:43PM

Main British Car:
1970 MGBGT V6, 7004R, AC, matching trailer 3.1 liter

Re: The not so flat liklyckfter.
Posted by: Citron
Date: January 19, 2017 11:23PM

I was taught that they are cut on a 32ft radius. I never tried to test that. A flat lifter will wear quickly since it will not rotate.
Steve


88v8
Ivor Duarte
Gloucestershire UK
(521 posts)

Registered:
02/11/2010 04:29AM

Main British Car:
1974 Land Rover Lightweight V8

Re: The not so flat lifter.
Posted by: 88v8
Date: January 20, 2017 05:33AM

AIUI it used to be normal practice that lifters were offset relative to the cam lobe. That's how they rotated. But the lifter was wide which increased valve train inertia. So then they were radiused and the cam was ground with a slight taper.
But when did that development become general ? Before WWII, or after?

Ivor


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