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tips, technology, tools and techniques related to vehicle driveline components

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88v8
Ivor Duarte
Gloucestershire UK
(758 posts)

Registered:
02/11/2010 04:29AM

Main British Car:
1974 Land Rover Lightweight V8

E10 fuel
Posted by: 88v8
Date: March 22, 2020 05:49AM

The gubmt is 'consulting' about the introduction of E10 as standard.
Consulting, means they've already decided of course..

Many garages will still have E5, and Super grade, but not all. Smaller garages don't have enough tanks for a lot of different fuels, nor enough forecourt space considering they're also supposed to have charge points. So I can't rely on avoiding E10.

It seems you've had ethanol fuels a long time in the US. What issues am I likely to have ? Other than worse gas mileage.

My 63 Rambler has a Holley, my Rover V8 is running an Edelbrock.

TIA

Ivor


Jim Stabe
Jim Stabe
San Diego, Ca
(757 posts)

Registered:
02/28/2009 10:01AM

Main British Car:
1966 MGB Roadster 350 LT1 Chevy

authors avatar
Re: E10 fuel
Posted by: Jim Stabe
Date: March 22, 2020 10:28AM

Worse gas mileage is the biggest thing I noticed. Doesn't seem to bother fuel system components and we have had it for years now.


MGBV8
Carl Floyd
Kingsport, TN
(3895 posts)

Registered:
10/23/2007 11:32PM

Main British Car:
1979 MGB, Buick 215

authors avatar
Re: E10 fuel
Posted by: MGBV8
Date: March 22, 2020 10:36AM

Yes, E10 seems to be standard here. E15 is in a number of midwestern states (not approved for any motorcycles). E0 is still available in many parts of USA.


88v8
Ivor Duarte
Gloucestershire UK
(758 posts)

Registered:
02/11/2010 04:29AM

Main British Car:
1974 Land Rover Lightweight V8

Re: E10 fuel
Posted by: 88v8
Date: March 23, 2020 05:20AM

Thankyou.

I read somewhere that fuel hose needs to be R9 or better. I see that the hose on my RV8 is R6 so I'll need to change that, and I'll get the hose changed on our 1990 shopping trolley as well..

When I bought the Edelbrock there was a sticker on it saying not guaranteed with E15, so I suppose the gaskets are OK for E10..

Do you run any additives?

Ivor


IaTR6
Dennis Costello
Central Iowa
(158 posts)

Registered:
12/29/2007 02:53PM

Main British Car:
'73 TR 6 '97 Explorer 5.0

Re: E10 fuel
Posted by: IaTR6
Date: March 23, 2020 03:28PM

Ivor,
When ethanol blended gasoline came on the US market, the solvent effect of the ethanol caused the contamination in underground fuel tanks and associated hoses and plumbing to be dissolved and transferred to vehicle fuel tanks. A considerable number of fuel filter clogs resulted. This could be an experience that may occur in your example. Also there were some rubber and plastic components which did not survive the change, but most of them are no longer in service.
After changing my TR6 to a fuel injected engine in 2014, I neglected to consider my past experience, and filled the tank with E10 blend as I do in my considerably newer daily vehicle. I apparently now have a clean fuel tank, as it immediately clogged my 10 micron post pump filter. The "goop" resists carb cleaner, and the sintered element had to be replaced. The clog also appeared back/charcoal in color, leading me to believe the fuel was attacking the combination of hoses I had used. All of the pressure hose was listed by the selling company as all fuel use, and was braided.
I also experienced considerable fuel odor in the garage, and one of my reasons for fuel injection in the first place was reduced fuel odor. So, I began an investigation of why this may be occurring, and found a large volume of information on the subject, some from knowledgeable sources, and some from
not so knowledgeable. I recommend you do your own searching, as I am not an expert either, just passing on my experience.
I subsequently removed all the braided and non-braided fuel hoses from my car, and replaced the braided sections with teflon lined (I think sometimes called flourocarbon-check me on that). Of course, all the fittings for the old 6AN hose didn't work with the new hose, so it became more expensive than I hoped.
I have used low vapor permeable hose (no financial interest here) from Gates. It is "Barricade", and for any pressure-and I can't think of where that would be off hand, I used a 30R14T2. All the vent lines from the carbon canister, gravity fuel lines from the tank to my surge tank, and the gravity line from the surge tank to the pump are 30R14T1, and this also includes the surge tank vent, which contains fuel any time the fuel tank is not empty.
I have eliminated fuel smell, making my passenger happy, and have not experienced any fuel filter clogging.
Dennis


MGBV8
Carl Floyd
Kingsport, TN
(3895 posts)

Registered:
10/23/2007 11:32PM

Main British Car:
1979 MGB, Buick 215

authors avatar
Re: E10 fuel
Posted by: MGBV8
Date: April 19, 2020 10:54AM

Thanks, Dennis!

My daughter would be happy with getting rid of the burning oil smell. ;)


MGBV8
Carl Floyd
Kingsport, TN
(3895 posts)

Registered:
10/23/2007 11:32PM

Main British Car:
1979 MGB, Buick 215

authors avatar
Re: E10 fuel
Posted by: MGBV8
Date: April 19, 2020 11:00AM

Quote:
Late model EFI cars now all use a fluoroelastomer fuel line that looks plastic but is actually a material called polytetrafluoroethylene PTFE. This material (first trademarked by DuPont as Teflon) is non-reactive to any common use fuels including methanol and even nitromethane! It also creates a fuel vapor barrier which does not allow the fuel to escape through the lines.




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