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88v8
Ivor Duarte
Gloucestershire UK
(993 posts)

Registered:
02/11/2010 04:29AM

Main British Car:
1974 Land Rover Lightweight V8

Painting the inside of the block
Posted by: 88v8
Date: June 12, 2022 05:10AM

Some engines used to be painted internally, to aid oil run-back, and when new to seal in casting sand.
Glyptal.... [www.frost.co.uk]

Worthwhile on a rebuild?
Or only on a racing engine?
Or not at all?

Ivor


BlownMGB-V8
Jim Blackwood
9406 Gunpowder Rd., Florence, KY 41042
(6218 posts)

Registered:
10/23/2007 12:59PM

Main British Car:
1971 MGB Blown,Injected,Intercooled Buick 340/AA80E/JagIRS

authors avatar
Re: Painting the inside of the block
Posted by: BlownMGB-V8
Date: June 12, 2022 07:23AM

Ivor, I used silver Cerrakote on my stroker 300 but it'll be awhile before I can tell you how well it holds up.

Jim


Jim Stabe
Jim Stabe
San Diego, Ca
(818 posts)

Registered:
02/28/2009 10:01AM

Main British Car:
1966 MGB Roadster 350 LT1 Chevy

authors avatar
Re: Painting the inside of the block
Posted by: Jim Stabe
Date: June 12, 2022 11:36AM

I have always been hesitant to paint the inside of the block or anything else that has oil running over it. All it would take is a small bit of paint that wasn't adhered well to get sucked up in the pump and ruin your entire day. Nothing wrong with smoothing the cast surfaces and streamlining the drain back holes but I would stay away from coating the surfaces. Just my $0.02


MGBV8
Carl Floyd
Kingsport, TN
(4284 posts)

Registered:
10/23/2007 11:32PM

Main British Car:
1979 MGB Buick 215

authors avatar
Re: Painting the inside of the block
Posted by: MGBV8
Date: June 17, 2022 10:21AM

"Nothing wrong with smoothing the cast surfaces and streamlining the drain back holes"

More than good enough for most of us.


tr8todd
Todd Kishbach

(387 posts)

Registered:
12/04/2009 07:42AM

Main British Car:


Re: Painting the inside of the block
Posted by: tr8todd
Date: June 20, 2022 06:43AM

This Olds block came with a parts hoard I acquired some years ago. Looks slick, but don't know if I will ever use it. Was slated for a dry sumped very high performance engine with Volvo adjustable rockers, big cam, high compression pistons, yada yada yada. It was to go into an aluminum monocoque custom built 2 seat race car thingy.
3E8D86A4-9211-4379-B45B-D26F93178927_1_105_c.jpeg


88v8
Ivor Duarte
Gloucestershire UK
(993 posts)

Registered:
02/11/2010 04:29AM

Main British Car:
1974 Land Rover Lightweight V8

Re: Painting the inside of the block
Posted by: 88v8
Date: June 21, 2022 04:22AM

I think it's a very different proposition, factory painting where the block is new and clean, really clean deep down in the pores, and the paint can be slow baked.
I'm not sure it's really possible to deep-clean a used block.

Perhaps for a show rod with a glass sump.

Ivor


BlownMGB-V8
Jim Blackwood
9406 Gunpowder Rd., Florence, KY 41042
(6218 posts)

Registered:
10/23/2007 12:59PM

Main British Car:
1971 MGB Blown,Injected,Intercooled Buick 340/AA80E/JagIRS

authors avatar
Re: Painting the inside of the block
Posted by: BlownMGB-V8
Date: June 21, 2022 08:44AM

I painted one. First I baked the block to burn out all the oils, then I sandblasted it, then I solvent washed it and dried it for a couple of days, and finally sprayed it with Cerrokote and have let it cure for months in a dry location.

Will it stick? I hope so. But, rust never sleeps.

Jim

300 block.gif



MGBV8
Carl Floyd
Kingsport, TN
(4284 posts)

Registered:
10/23/2007 11:32PM

Main British Car:
1979 MGB Buick 215

authors avatar
Re: Painting the inside of the block
Posted by: MGBV8
Date: June 21, 2022 09:53AM

You fit that in your oven?


BlownMGB-V8
Jim Blackwood
9406 Gunpowder Rd., Florence, KY 41042
(6218 posts)

Registered:
10/23/2007 12:59PM

Main British Car:
1971 MGB Blown,Injected,Intercooled Buick 340/AA80E/JagIRS

authors avatar
Re: Painting the inside of the block
Posted by: BlownMGB-V8
Date: June 22, 2022 09:48AM

Yep. Ran the self cleaning cycle on it.


mgb260
Jim Nichols
Sequim,WA
(2241 posts)

Registered:
02/29/2008 08:29PM

Main British Car:
1973 MGB roadster 260 Ford V8

Re: Painting the inside of the block
Posted by: mgb260
Date: June 22, 2022 10:24AM

Wife must not have been at home! LOL I got caught cleaning tail light and front parking light lenses in the dishwasher!


MGBV8
Carl Floyd
Kingsport, TN
(4284 posts)

Registered:
10/23/2007 11:32PM

Main British Car:
1979 MGB Buick 215

authors avatar
Re: Painting the inside of the block
Posted by: MGBV8
Date: June 22, 2022 01:06PM

He has his own oven (& washer & dryer) out in his workshop. I would have liked to have seen that iron block go up the stairs & into the oven. Probably brought it over the side. Tow motor or hoist?


mgb260
Jim Nichols
Sequim,WA
(2241 posts)

Registered:
02/29/2008 08:29PM

Main British Car:
1973 MGB roadster 260 Ford V8

Re: Painting the inside of the block
Posted by: mgb260
Date: June 22, 2022 01:26PM

Yeah, I knew he had his own oven. Just my attempt of humor. A couple of strong young helpers could pack it but probably a hoist.


BlownMGB-V8
Jim Blackwood
9406 Gunpowder Rd., Florence, KY 41042
(6218 posts)

Registered:
10/23/2007 12:59PM

Main British Car:
1971 MGB Blown,Injected,Intercooled Buick 340/AA80E/JagIRS

authors avatar
Re: Painting the inside of the block
Posted by: BlownMGB-V8
Date: June 23, 2022 08:30AM

Fork lift. The mezzanine railing has a section that lifts out. (Unfortunately the fork lift has a bad seal so I can't use it much and it only works inside where there is concrete) Still had to get it over to the oven though. The block weighs 140lbs so heavy yeah but manageable. I might have used a dolly, don't recall. The rack in the oven sagged a bit. I've abused that oven very badly to the point where it needs remedial attention on the controls. Strange but it seems they never were intended to heat a large 1/4" thick sheet of brass with all 4 burners under a 25 gallon pot. There was some meltage but it's all good, I'm sure I can fix it. Running the self clean cycle on engine blocks was also a bit excessive. You really don't need 700 degrees F to bake a block and the oven wasn't designed for that kind of thermal mass at that heat. It's an all day project. But on the plus side when it's done you just shake out the ash. So to speak. Seriously though, 500 degrees for a couple of hours is enough.

I still hadn't installed the 2nd hand dish washer, and then I went and stole it for the bus. I really wanted that for the shop, but apparently not all that badly. Speaking of washer/drier I have a load of shop rags to run.

These are all 2nd hand appliances of somewhat dodgy nature but usable. They simply turn up from time to time and make serviceable if somewhat temporary auxiliary shop equipment. I'm sure many of you have done the same.

Jim


MGBV8
Carl Floyd
Kingsport, TN
(4284 posts)

Registered:
10/23/2007 11:32PM

Main British Car:
1979 MGB Buick 215

authors avatar
Re: Painting the inside of the block
Posted by: MGBV8
Date: June 23, 2022 11:12AM

500 degrees worked fine for that exhaust manifold we cooked. Probably would have for that block with more time.


soi6
Tim east

(65 posts)

Registered:
06/24/2018 06:40PM

Main British Car:


Re: Painting the inside of the block
Posted by: soi6
Date: August 23, 2022 07:22AM

Here in the Uk, sounds starnge but get down to Wilko & buy some red step paint, I was advised by my local engine machinest to use it, Ive used it & my friends have on Ford, Chevy blocks, just de grease it well & its never a problem!



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