Steering, Suspension, & Brakes

tips, technology, tools and techniques related to non-driveline mechanical components

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pspeaks
Paul Speaks
Dallas, Texas
(698 posts)

Registered:
07/20/2009 06:40PM

Main British Car:
1972 MGB-GT 1979 Ford 302

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Steering
Posted by: pspeaks
Date: May 21, 2014 01:02AM

I'm making a couple of slight changes to my steering shaft and in the process found a little play in one of my outer rod ends. I tried the fork method with no success and my next step is to try a little heat on it. Is this a good idea or not? I'm changing both of them and the boots while I'm at it. I also want to replace the oil in it too but I've never done that; recommendations would be greatly appreciated.


Paul


DiDueColpi
Fred Key
West coast - Canada
(1309 posts)

Registered:
05/14/2010 03:06AM

Main British Car:
I really thought that I'd be an action figure by now!

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Re: Steering
Posted by: DiDueColpi
Date: May 21, 2014 03:00AM

Hey Paul,
No heat!
Bad things happen to good steering parts when you heat them.
The pickle fork should work, you just need to line it up so that the force vector lines up with the steering arm.
The idea is to provide a "backing" for the pickle fork to hammer into.
The down side to this device is that the joint is almost always destroyed in the removal process.
The best way is with a proper puller.
IMGP9444.JPG
IMGP9445.JPG
Something like this won't tear the boot or damage the joint.
There is also the two hammer method, but the chance of damage to the steering arm is very high.
So we'll just file that one away with the heat idea.
Your steering rack contained gear oil when new. It holds 1/2 pints and is filled with a small nozzle through one of the boots with the clamp loosened off.
I personally prefer to use moly grease. It has better lubricity and more "sticktion" so it won't all leak out through a split boot.
Just drill and tap the plate for the rack slipper and add a grease nipple.
You can now maintain your rack at will.
Hope that's helpfull
Fred


Jim Stabe
Jim Stabe
San Diego, Ca
(800 posts)

Registered:
02/28/2009 10:01AM

Main British Car:
1966 MGB Roadster 350 LT1 Chevy

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Re: Steering
Posted by: Jim Stabe
Date: May 21, 2014 03:58PM

Try giving the arm a solid whack with a hammer. I've had good luck using that method.


pspeaks
Paul Speaks
Dallas, Texas
(698 posts)

Registered:
07/20/2009 06:40PM

Main British Car:
1972 MGB-GT 1979 Ford 302

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Re: Steering
Posted by: pspeaks
Date: May 21, 2014 08:33PM

Thanks Jim, I tried the hammer method too; maybe I'm too old and weak to hit it hard enough.

Thanks Fred, Summit has the removal tool you recommended, and I promise, no heat..


Paul



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/21/2014 08:40PM by pspeaks.


MGBV8
Carl Floyd
Kingsport, TN
(4121 posts)

Registered:
10/23/2007 11:32PM

Main British Car:
1979 MGB, Buick 215

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Re: Steering
Posted by: MGBV8
Date: May 21, 2014 08:58PM

I just borrow one from Advance Auto. So much nicer than the pickle fork method.


BlownMGB-V8
Jim Blackwood
9406 Gunpowder Rd., Florence, KY 41042
(6070 posts)

Registered:
10/23/2007 12:59PM

Main British Car:
1971 MGB Blown,Injected,Intercooled Buick 340/AA80E/JagIRS

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Re: Steering
Posted by: BlownMGB-V8
Date: May 22, 2014 09:40AM

That removal tool is the way to go and you can borrow them from your local parts house. But if (when) you resort to the hammer method, here's the scoop: What you are doing is *slightly* and *temporarily* deforming the taper socket so that it loses its grip on the taper pin. As a forged piece this should not do any long term damage to the socket, but is very likely to produce dents on the outside of it. To do that most effectively takes two large hammers of about two pound weight, as big as you can effectively swing in the allowed space and hit your target smartly. There are two methods. You can use one as a "backer" much like you use a dolly when doing body work, to increase the mass of the knuckle and make the blow more effective and swing the other smartly into contact directly opposite across the socket. In this case the backer should be as large and heavy as it can be and still fit and be held snugly in place. The other method is to swing both hammers into contact simultaneously, but obviously this requires greater skill and coordination. The advantage is that considerably lighter hammers can do the trick.
Using a single hammer is both singularly ineffective and much more likely to damage the steering knuckle, But in a pinch it often can be made to work.

Jim


pspeaks
Paul Speaks
Dallas, Texas
(698 posts)

Registered:
07/20/2009 06:40PM

Main British Car:
1972 MGB-GT 1979 Ford 302

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Re: Steering
Posted by: pspeaks
Date: May 24, 2014 08:18PM

Hey guys, I decided to try the "pickle fork" one more time and it worked; yes it messed the rubber on the rod ends up a bit, but they're 42 years old and I'm replacing them anyway. Now I've got my steering rack out so I can set in front of the flat screen in the garage, smoke a cigar (don't hate me), watch "Wheeler Dealers" and get my steering redone. As I already have them, I'm also changing my calipers, disks and wheel bearings while I'm at it; got to get all them parts out of their boxes. Fred, I'm taking your advice and installing a grease fitting. Thanks for all the info, you guys are the best.


Paul



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 05/24/2014 08:26PM by pspeaks.



pspeaks
Paul Speaks
Dallas, Texas
(698 posts)

Registered:
07/20/2009 06:40PM

Main British Car:
1972 MGB-GT 1979 Ford 302

authors avatar
Re: Steering
Posted by: pspeaks
Date: June 08, 2014 02:11AM

An after thought here. Does using moly grease cause the steering to be a little stiff in cold weather or is it enough to be noticeable?



Paul


DiDueColpi
Fred Key
West coast - Canada
(1309 posts)

Registered:
05/14/2010 03:06AM

Main British Car:
I really thought that I'd be an action figure by now!

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Re: Steering
Posted by: DiDueColpi
Date: June 09, 2014 06:04AM

I'm from Canada Paul.
Define "cold".


pspeaks
Paul Speaks
Dallas, Texas
(698 posts)

Registered:
07/20/2009 06:40PM

Main British Car:
1972 MGB-GT 1979 Ford 302

authors avatar
Re: Steering
Posted by: pspeaks
Date: June 09, 2014 01:57PM

It's only 64 today, but admittedly it gets 107 here in Dallas during the summer. To make up for that heat it can get around 16 for days at a time in the winter. I had a 65 Mustang with a four speed which would get a bit hard to shift in the winter. I was just curious but if it's not a problem for you in Canada, it shouldn't be a problem for me here.


Paul



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/09/2014 01:59PM by pspeaks.


pspeaks
Paul Speaks
Dallas, Texas
(698 posts)

Registered:
07/20/2009 06:40PM

Main British Car:
1972 MGB-GT 1979 Ford 302

authors avatar
Re: Steering
Posted by: pspeaks
Date: June 10, 2014 04:49PM

I've tried to order tie rod ends from Victoria British and Moss but both have been out of stock for some time. Does anyone know if there is a match I can get from a parts store?


Paul


MGBV8
Carl Floyd
Kingsport, TN
(4121 posts)

Registered:
10/23/2007 11:32PM

Main British Car:
1979 MGB, Buick 215

authors avatar
Re: Steering
Posted by: MGBV8
Date: June 10, 2014 04:58PM

Rockauto.com


DiDueColpi
Fred Key
West coast - Canada
(1309 posts)

Registered:
05/14/2010 03:06AM

Main British Car:
I really thought that I'd be an action figure by now!

authors avatar
Re: Steering
Posted by: DiDueColpi
Date: June 10, 2014 05:56PM

Worldpac. Part # QR1153

On McEwen road downtown Dallas.


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