Bodywork, Paint, Interior, Trim, & Wiring

discussions about bodywork, paint, interiors, trim, audio, electrical components, wiring, etc.

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WernerVC
Werner Van Clapdurp
Lynchburg, Va
(93 posts)

Registered:
09/06/2009 12:56PM

Main British Car:
MGB 1977 Rover 3.5

primer
Posted by: WernerVC
Date: September 11, 2012 09:24PM

I am in the process of removing all the old paint to bare metal. In order to prevent rust, what kind of primer should I use or is etching also a good solution. What is the difference and are there limits as to what kind of paint can be applied later. Can the primer be applied with a brush because I am just doing one panel at a time so spraying the primer would waste a lot on a small panel or surface. I removed the old paint with a 4.5" fiberglass alu oxide covered wheel. Works great. Will try soda blastingin the nooks and crannies. Anybody has experience with soda blasting ?


crashbash
david bash
st. charles
(215 posts)

Registered:
01/28/2008 10:53AM

Main British Car:
1979 MGB Rdst V8 project, 1968 MGC GT, 1969 MGB Rd olds 215

Re: primer
Posted by: crashbash
Date: September 13, 2012 12:25PM

self etching primer 1st, then build up primer coats.....you can buy self etching primer in spray cans from automotive paint store, quarts, gallons, etc green looking stuff you might have seen on new aircraft assembly line pics


rficalora
Rob Ficalora
Willis, TX
(2647 posts)

Registered:
10/24/2007 02:46PM

Main British Car:
'76 MGB w/CB front, Sebring rear, early metal dash Ford 302

authors avatar
Re: primer
Posted by: rficalora
Date: September 13, 2012 07:27PM

What about using an epoxy primer as the 1st layer. Any material benefit?


MG four six eight
Bill Jacobson
Wa state
(299 posts)

Registered:
10/23/2007 02:15AM

Main British Car:
73 MGB Buick 215, Eaton/GM supercharger

Re: primer
Posted by: MG four six eight
Date: September 16, 2012 12:59AM

I use Dupont Vari-prime and then cover it with PPG K-36 epoxy primer/surfacer. Vari-prime is a self-etching 2 part primer that is yellow/green in color. It is thin for spraying but I have brushed it on before, for small areas.

Bill


mgbreis
Ryan Reis
Beatrice, NE
(202 posts)

Registered:
07/16/2008 11:07AM

Main British Car:


Re: primer
Posted by: mgbreis
Date: September 20, 2012 12:06PM

I've painted three cars now, always using epoxy on first coat over bare metal. I've never used etching primer and while I've had issues, I've NEVER had an adhesion problem. I don't use etching because it has to go over completely bare metal and after I've stripped my cars I can't say there aren't any nooks and crannies that still have a little paint here and there. If you don't want to spray, I guess you could try rolling on the epoxy primer, but I can't say exactly what the paint would do to a foam roller. You're just promoting adhesion, sealing the metal and preventing corrosion. You will want to sand out all the flaws when you're doing the 2k and block sanding steps.


flitner
John Fenner
Miami Fl
(168 posts)

Registered:
03/11/2010 10:58AM

Main British Car:
1972 MGB 350 CHEVY

Re: primer
Posted by: flitner
Date: September 20, 2012 07:03PM

I too advise to go with epoxy primer over bare metal, I used Variprime as well as Duponts lower grade etching primer, body filler does not adhere to etch primer even after a year of being applied, epoxy can be filled over.


rficalora
Rob Ficalora
Willis, TX
(2647 posts)

Registered:
10/24/2007 02:46PM

Main British Car:
'76 MGB w/CB front, Sebring rear, early metal dash Ford 302

authors avatar
Re: primer
Posted by: rficalora
Date: September 20, 2012 08:28PM

That's what I thought. I put epoxy primer on after stripping to bare metal but I'm no expert so didn't want to say it was better till others chimed in.



nobogez07
Doug Brown
Webster, South Dakota
(58 posts)

Registered:
12/11/2012 05:38PM

Main British Car:
1971 Mk II MGB coupe 1992 302 Ford H.O. EFI

Re: primer
Posted by: nobogez07
Date: December 16, 2012 06:54PM

Etch primer is for use on aluminum not steel! For a steel body it's advisable to remove all prior paint followed by a complete cleaning (Trisodium Phosphate is a great choice) and finally if you can find it, a hand wipe with an iron phosphate product. This provides a conversion coating barrier much like OEM auto companies do prior to e-coating all bodies. This conversion coating acts as a sacrificial barrier to any oxygen that will eventually permeate through the paint film over time.

This process is why you don't see cars today that have the "cancer" you saw in cars years ago


Preform Resources
Dave Craddock
Redford,Michigan
(359 posts)

Registered:
12/20/2008 05:46PM

Main British Car:
72 MGB V6 3.4

Re: primer
Posted by: Preform Resources
Date: December 18, 2012 11:29AM

Thanks Doug, very informative ! which phosphate product do you suggest ?
Dave


BlownMGB-V8
Jim Blackwood
9406 Gunpowder Rd., Florence, KY 41042
(5855 posts)

Registered:
10/23/2007 12:59PM

Main British Car:
1971 MGB Blown,Injected,Intercooled Buick 340/AA80E/JagIRS

authors avatar
Re: primer
Posted by: BlownMGB-V8
Date: December 18, 2012 08:04PM

You can buy straight phosphoric acid at the hardware store.

Jim


tdecell
Trey Decell
MS
(31 posts)

Registered:
04/10/2010 12:13AM

Main British Car:
1974.5 MGB GT 3.9L Rover

authors avatar
Re: primer
Posted by: tdecell
Date: December 21, 2012 09:30PM

Soda blasting works well, just not good enough for large areas. Would probably do good for nooks and crannies like you mentioned. It's just a little slow and makes a HUGE mess. And kills grass like nobodys business... unless you hose down the area really good afterward.


nobogez07
Doug Brown
Webster, South Dakota
(58 posts)

Registered:
12/11/2012 05:38PM

Main British Car:
1971 Mk II MGB coupe 1992 302 Ford H.O. EFI

Re: primer
Posted by: nobogez07
Date: January 16, 2013 02:20PM

Where to get a hand wipe iron phosphate? That's a great question and one I'd never thought of for the average guy painting his or her project car.

We do millions of parts for OEM manufacturers and buy ours from specialty chemical manufacturers. Using straight phosphoric acid is not reccomended as there are no inhibitors added to control the reaction. So the anwser to the queston would be as follows:

1. If you know of a company that paints its own product in your area, you could go in and ask them to buy a quart or so or their Iron Phosphate (it'll be diluted 10:1). The cost to you would resonably be $10.00.

2. If you can't find any, as a last resort I'd go ahead and send a quart to you for $10.00 plus shipping and handling.(Please understand we're not a retail company so this is not our business!!)


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